Top 10 Tuesday: Non-White Female Protagonists

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Top 10 Tuesday! I cheated this week and did 12… there’s just so many good ones! Presented to you in no particular order:

  1. Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi – When Snow is born to Boy it is revealed that Boy’s husband Arturo Whitman is from a light-skinned black family passing for white.
  2. Caucasia by Danzy Senna – Caucasia is the coming-of-age story of Birdie and Cole, multiracial sisters who have a white mother and black father.
  3. My Year of Meats by Ruth L. Ozeki – Jane Takagi-Little is a Japanese American journalist who is hired to work for a Japanese production company on a television show about American meat dishes.
  4. Birdie by Tracey Lindberg – Bernice Meetoos, a Cree woman, leaves her home in Northern Alberta following tragedy and travels to Gibsons, BC.
  5. Salt Fish Girl by Larissa Lai – Salt Fish Girl intertwines the story of Nu Wa, the shape-shifter, and that of Miranda, a troubled young girl living in the walled city of Serendipity circa 2044.
  6. The Vegetarian by Han Kang – Yeong-hye decides to renounce eating meat following a series of strange dreams.
  7. Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson – Ti-Jeanne, the granddaughter of Gros-Jeanne, is struggling with life in a dystopian future Toronto.
  8. Half World by Hiromi Goto – Melanie Tamaki is human but her parents are from Half World, a Limbo between our world and the afterlife. Her mother disappears and Melanie must travel to Half World to rescue her.
  9. Kindred by Octavia E. Butler – Dana is a young African-American woman writer who finds herself traveling between her home in 1976 and a slave-era Southern plantation.
  10. The Girl in the Road by Monica Byrne – Meena, a young woman living in a futuristic Mumbai must flee India and return to her home in Ethiopia.
  11. The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo – Li Lan receives an offer from the wealthy Lim family to become the ghost bride of their deceased son.
  12. Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – 15 year old Kambili struggles under the strict rule of her Catholic father in Nigeria.

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2 comments

  1. Thank you so much for this! I love to read, but I am so tired of hearing one perspective and one characterization. Experiencing the lives of different people from different perspectives is the whole reason reading is so incredible!

    • Yesssss I totally agree with you! I want to read about a wide variety of different experiences, not just white America. It takes a bit of hunting sometimes, but there’s lots of great stories out there

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